Tagged: nature photography

I took a Sunday drive with two photographer friends of mine today and these are the snaps I found along the way. In my job as a newspaper photojournalist, I don’t get to experiment with black and white photography much. The day was gray and foggy, so the conversion to B+W seemed natural. I spent the first half of my career shooting Tri-X film and printing my photos in a darkroom. I sometimes miss those days–except for the smell of fixer on my hands and clothes.  All teses photos were shot with my new Nikon D4 and a selection of  Nikkor Lenses (24-120mm f/4, 300mm f/4, and a 60mm macro.)

cut-wheat-b+w

fairfield-cemetery

frozen-grass
light-on-hill-B+W

Palouse farm road

tractor-tires

windmill_b+w

Coming home from a brush fire on Upriver Drive Friday evening, I spotted this huddle of goslings along the Spokane River.  It was just too cute to pass up. As I approached, the sun popped through a seam in the clouds for just a few seconds. All the other snaps I took under cloud cover had flat cool light, which killed the cuteness.  Nikon D3s, Nikkor 300 mm f/4

Goslings huddle along the Spokane River Friday, May 25, 2012, in Spokane, Wash. Colin Mulvany/The Spokesman-Review.

 

 

When I teach my Intro to Photojournalism class at a community college, I always tell my students: “There are photos all around you–you just have to see them.”  As I got behind the wheel of my car parked in my driveway, I almost hit the windshield wipers before stopping an staring at the maple leaf nestled in raindrops on the glass. I grabbed my Nikon D700 with a 60 mm macro lens from the trunk and fired away. My neighbor’s porch lamp added a warm light element that adds some mystery to the image. Without a caption, I think most people viewing the photo would stare at it for awhile as they try and decode all the layers of information.

A soggy maple leaf, photographed from inside a car, found a resting place stuck to a windshield Tuesday, Feb. 15, 2011. A mix of rain and snow may change to all snow tonight, according to the National Weather Service.