Tagged: Colin Mulvany

Walking in a parking lot today, I spotted this rainbow of colors created from a mixture of leaked car oil and rainwater. It is a photo that most people would step over and not pay much bother. I like to see the beauty in things that are not considered beautiful.

Looking for a feature photo Tuesday, I spent an hour or so watching four people lazily skate around the Riverfront Park Ice Palace rink. About to give up, a dad with his young daughter showed up. He told me it was the four-year old’s first time on skates. The minute they stepped on the ice, a look of terror flashed across her face. Moment captured. The best part was a email I received from a reader who saw the published snap today: ” Thank you for the cute and hysterically funny picture on the front-page of today’s newspaper…it’s brought a smile to me all during this cloudy day.”

ice_palacesaf

Today was one of those get in the car and cruise for a feature picture kind of day. I’m burnt out on shooting fall color photos, so when I spotted this flock of House Sparrows attacking a bird feeder in West Central, I knew I  could make decent snap for tomorrow’s paper. I used a high shutter speed –1/4000 of a second, which froze the birds in flight without any blur. Nikon D4, Nikkor 300mm f/4 lens

House Sparrows

While composing  a photograph of the jellyfish exhibit  at the Seattle Aquarium, a line of people with their mobile phones and point and shoot cameras competed for the same snap.  I just assumed these ” photographers” had taken the same image as me. Later, after doing a Google Images  search of the jellyfish exhibit at the Seattle aquarium, I found only blurry or poorly composed shots. In a week where many newspaper photojournalists were laid off from their publications, I realize the value of  of what I do as an experienced photojournalist. iPhone-style photography only goes so far. Seeing a photo rather just than just taking a picture is the dividing line between being a photographer and someone who just pushes a button. Nikon D4, Nikkor 24-120mm f/4 lens

Jellyfish_SAF2

At a public memorial today, I was photographing an honor guard transferring Spokane firefighter John Knighten’s casket from a fire truck to a funeral gurney. Capt. Mike Rose, one of the honor guard firefighters suddenly started to posture in front of the casket then collapsed. I reflexively fired off a burst of about six frames. It looked like the man was having a seizure. Paramedics arrived and quickly transported him to the hospital. The memorial went on without missing a beat. From a photojournalism perspective, this was the best moment I captured today. I’ve shot dozens of memorials in my career, but never witnessed anything like this. This photo did not make the newspaper or online gallery and I am fine with that. The story today was about remembering veteran firefighter John Knighten, 45, who died on June 30, 2013, after a three-year battle with cancer. I think publishing this photo in the newspaper would detract from that. Colin Mulvany/The Spokesman-Review, Nikon D4, Nikkor 24-12mm f/4

Update: Read: Terrifying Collapse in the Spokesman-Review. We interviewed Capt. Mike Rose about his firefighting career with the Spokane Fire Department and found out what happened that day when he collapsed during a funeral for a fellow firefighter.

COLLASPEsaf

I took a Sunday drive with two photographer friends of mine today and these are the snaps I found along the way. In my job as a newspaper photojournalist, I don’t get to experiment with black and white photography much. The day was gray and foggy, so the conversion to B+W seemed natural. I spent the first half of my career shooting Tri-X film and printing my photos in a darkroom. I sometimes miss those days–except for the smell of fixer on my hands and clothes.  All teses photos were shot with my new Nikon D4 and a selection of  Nikkor Lenses (24-120mm f/4, 300mm f/4, and a 60mm macro.)

cut-wheat-b+w

fairfield-cemetery

frozen-grass
light-on-hill-B+W

Palouse farm road

tractor-tires

windmill_b+w

I’ve been hooked on shooting fall color lately. Spokane is beautiful this time of year. I sometimes have to remind myself to slow down and appreciate the palette of colors fall brings each year. Photos Colin Mulvany/©The Spokesman-Review

American cranberry bush

Elm tree, Cannon Hill Park

        Embedded Maple leaf, Spokane, Wash.

           Wilted Zinnia bloom, Spokane Wash.

I was shooting a photo assignment in Riverfront Park Friday and looked up and saw this pattern in the Rotary Fountain. Not sure why I like this photo, but I do. The raw file was flat and uninteresting, but when I jacked the shadow slider in Photoshop’s levels to the right, this wonderful blue sky popped out. Nikon D3s Nikkor 24-120mm f/4 Colin Mulvany/The Spokesman-Review

At the Spokane Falls Northwest Indian Pow Wow Friday in Riverfront Park, I spotted Colville Tribe member Tarah Loer,16, preparing for the grand entry. The car interior was dark and the background was backlit, so I used that to my advantage. I shot the photo wide-open with my 85 mm f/1.4 lens, which softened the background and isolated the my subject. I like the mix of warm and cool light and the intimacy the moment holds. Nikon D 700.

Coming home from a brush fire on Upriver Drive Friday evening, I spotted this huddle of goslings along the Spokane River.  It was just too cute to pass up. As I approached, the sun popped through a seam in the clouds for just a few seconds. All the other snaps I took under cloud cover had flat cool light, which killed the cuteness.  Nikon D3s, Nikkor 300 mm f/4

Goslings huddle along the Spokane River Friday, May 25, 2012, in Spokane, Wash. Colin Mulvany/The Spokesman-Review.